Tiredness – an accident waiting to happen

In Great Britain alone, there were over 185,010 road traffic injuries and fatalities (year ending June 2016), yet nearly 139,000 could have been prevented if motorists were less distracted when driving.

Whilst loss of concentration through tiredness is well documented to be the greatest cause of road accidents (62%), a new survey by Exchange and Mart reveals that nearly one in four motorists readily admit to regularly driving in these circumstances – and men are more prone to driving when tired than women.

Marking the 19th Road Safety Week, 21-25 November, Exchange and Mart has launched its ‘Distracted Driving’ website, offering motorists a vital guide to driving safely and avoiding distractions.

Jim Murray Jones, general manager for Exchange and Mart explained, ‘Whatever the distraction, as many as 72% of drivers surveyed admitted to multitasking whilst driving and, as such, are putting themselves and their passengers at considerable risk. The launch of our Distracted Driving website will support people making the Brake Pledge; to drive slow, sober, secure, silent, sharp and sustainable.’

Whilst only nine per cent of motorists surveyed by Exchange and Mart said they use their mobile phone when driving, mobile phone usage by drivers remains the second most common cause of road traffic accidents. The third largest cause of driving accidents is people getting distracted by things outside their vehicle (seven per cent).