Motorists want future legislation input

British road users want their voice to be heard when it comes to drawing up new traffic laws, it appears.

A UK-based car leasing company has found that a majority of road users want to be asked about future legislation for drivers to counteract what is largely seen as a government ‘war on motorists’.

However, the Flexed.co.uk company found that – when pushed – many drivers probably couldn’t be trusted with coming up with sensible ideas, with ‘blues and twos’ for takeaway drivers topping the list of daft traffic law suggestions.

‘The average driver thinks they’re being targeted for fines and taxes every time they take to the road with nothing being done to make their lives easier or cheaper,’ said Flexed.co.uk spokesperson Mark Hall, ‘No wonder they’re bursting at the seams with new traffic laws, no matter how daft.’

Flexed.co.uk asked over 1200 drivers of both cars and commercial vehicles about existing road laws and regulations. Out of 1200 drivers, 76% said they thought there was a government ‘war on motorists’, 69% thought that road ministers and local councils don’t listen to drivers’ needs whilst 56% said they would like a say in proposing traffic laws through a suggestions and referendum scheme.

When Flexed.co.uk pushed drivers for their ideas, the company got a mix of the bizarre and the genius, along with some sensible suggestions which warrant further investigation.

Flexed.co.uk said, ‘Yes, we’d all love a remote control for traffic lights, especially those so-called ‘smart’ ones that go red just as you drive up to them,’ says Mark Hall, “But there are one or two excellent ideas here that absolutely require further thought.’

Flexed.co.uk is enthused about stricter laws for children riding as front-seat passengers and the call to scrap Vehicle Excise Duty.

‘The government scrapped the tax disc last year, and now would be a good time to get rid of the ‘road tax’ for once and for all,” says Hall. ‘It’s a layer of taxation and bureaucracy that can be best collected through other means.’